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FILO PARTY BOX COMBO 15

1 x 15inch POWERED (ACTIVE) SPEAKER

 -BUILT IN BLUETOOTH

 -USB / SD CARD INPUT

 -MIC INPUT

 -BASS & TERRIBLE CONTROL

1 x 15inch NON POWERED (PASSIVE) SPEAKER

2 x SPEAKER STAND

1 x SPEAKER LINK CABLE

COMBO DEAL = R4900 CASH ONLY

 

ideal megphones mic system for all your outdoor events like rallys, marches, political rallys and announcements available at gravity dj store 0315072736

Megaphones, loudhailers, and pa amplifiers used in public hearings, schools and elections a system of microphones, amplifiers, and loudspeakers used to amplify speech or music in a large building or at an outdoor gathering.This article is about audio systems. For public IP addresses, see IP address.Durable sound for events, evacuation, meetings and political rallies. Professional advice is free and is a phone call away Megaphone

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the amplification device. For the chemical compound, see Megaphone (molecule). For other uses, see Megaphone (disambiguation).
"Bullhorn" redirects here. For the G.I. Joe character, see Bullhorn (G.I. Joe). For the type of tree, see Bullhorn Acacia.
 
A late 19th-century speaking trumpet used by firefighters.
 
A small sports megaphone for cheering at sporting events, next to a 3 in. cigarette lighter for scale
 
Drawing by Athanasius Kircher, 1684, shows man (left) using megaphone to communicate over distance
A megaphone, speaking-trumpet, bullhorn, or loud hailer is a portable, usually hand-held, cone-shaped acoustic horn used to amplify a person’s voice or other sounds and direct it in a given direction. The sound is introduced into the narrow end of the megaphone, by holding it up to the face and speaking into it, and the sound waves radiate out the wide end. The megaphone increases the volume of sound by increasing the acoustic impedance seen by the vocal cords, matching the impedance of the vocal cords to the air, so that more sound power is radiated. It also serves to direct the sound waves in the direction the horn is pointing. It somewhat distorts the sound of the voice because the frequency response of the megaphone is greater at higher sound frequencies.
Since the 1960s the voice-powered acoustic With Edison’s megaphone, a low whisper could be heard a thousand feet away, while a normal tone of voice could be heard roughly two miles away. On the listening end, the receiver could hear a low whisper at a thousand feet away. However the apparatus was much too large to be portable, limiting its use. George Prescott wrote: “The principal drawback at present is the large size of the apparatus.”
 
Since the 1960s acoustic megaphones have generally been replaced by electric versionmegaphone described above has been replaced by the electric megaphone, which uses electric power to amplify the voice.Electric megaphones[edit]
 
 
(left) Woman using a handheld electric megaphone at a demonstration in Portugal. (right) Electric megaphones use a type of horn loudspeaker called a reflex or reentrant horn. The sound waves travel in a zigzag path through concentric widening ducts (b, c, and d).
An electric megaphone is a handheld public address system, an electronic device that amplifies the human voice like an acoustic megaphone, using electric power. It consists of a microphone to convert sound waves into an electrical audio signal, an amplifier powered by a battery to increase the power of the audio signal, and a loudspeaker to convert the audio signal to sound waves again. Although slightly heavier than acoustic megaphones, electric megaphones can amplify the voice to a higher level, to over 90 dB. They have replaced acoustic megaphones in most applications, and are generally used to address congregations of people wherever stationary public address systems are not available; at outdoor sporting events, movie sets, political rallies, and street demonstrations.
 
Although electronic public address systems have existed since vacuum tube amplifiers were developed in the early 1920s, vacuum tube versions were too heavy to be portable. Practical portable electric megaphones had to await the development of microelectronics which followed the invention of the transistor in 1947. In 1954, TOA Corporation developed the EM-202, the world's first transistorized megaphone.[4]
 
Handheld versions are shaped generally like the old acoustic megaphone, with a microphone at one end and a horn speaker at the other, and a pistol grip on the side, with a trigger switch to turn it on. In use, the device is held up to the mouth, and the trigger is pressed to turn it on while speaking. Other larger versions hang from the shoulder on a strap, and have a separate handheld microphone on a cord to speak into, so users can address a crowd without the instrument obscuring their faces. A vast array of modern electric megaphones are available to puPortable megaphones are widely used for crowd management and mass communication. When needing to transmit important information or to guide a large number of people, an electric megaphone is valuable if other public announcement systems are not present.
 
Besides their practical implications, public address systems, including megaphones, also had a social impact. Public address systems helped promote women’s participation in society. In events like the National Republican and Democratic Conventions of 1920, when electronic public address systems were first becoming popularized, women used these amplifying technologies during roll call of participants.[6] Later, portable electric megaphones extended this equalizing influence to outdoor events.
 
Cheerleading is one of the few fields that still uses acoustic megaphones. Cheerleaders at the University of Minnesota are credited with first using acoustic megaphones in routines in 1898. Since then, cheerleaders have relied heavily on acoustic megaphones during performances at sporting events. Generally, female cheerleaders would use pom pons while male cheerleaders, with loud booming voices, would project cheers through megaphones. [7] Vocal projection is an important aspect for cheerleading, so experts recommend the use of acoustic megaphonE MEGAPHONES / LOUDHAILERS
 
Megaphones / Loudhailers
A megaphone, speaking-trumpet, bullhorn, or loud hailer is a portable, hand-held, funnel cone-shaped device whose application is to amplify a person’s voice towards a targeted direction and distance. Common uses for megaphones are at sporting events, political functions, electioneering, auctions, crowd control, emergency situations and generally when one needs to address congregations of people in large areas or outdoors. We have a very large range of megaphones for sale and deliver throughout South Africa.
 
see also: Vehicle PA Systems & Horn Speakers
 
 
 
Show:  
(PAM001) Megaphone - Loudhailer 30W Pistol + Loose Mic 
(PAM001) Megaphone - Loudhailer 30W Pistol + Loose Mic
Megaphone / Loudhailer / Bullhorn 30W with Siren & Detachable Microphone This 30-Watt Megaphone comes with an attached remote microphone so you can deliver your message loud and clear without straining your arms. Carry the megaphone on your shoulder with the strap and talk into the microphone instead of holding the megaphone to your mouth. The PAM001 30W Megaphone is an incredibly loud megaphone that stands out due to how easy it i..
(PAM001C) Megaphone - Loudhailer 25W with Loose Mic & shoulder strap
(PAM001C) Megaphone - Loudhailer 25W with Loose Mic & shoulder strap
Shoulder Megaphone 25W with shoulder strap & stand This 25-Watt Megaphone comes with an attached remote microphone so you can deliver your message loud and clear without straining your arms. Carry the megaphone on your shoulder with the strap and talk into the microphone instead of holding the megaphone to your mouth. It also features a stand / feet so you can easily place it on a table or any flat surface. This is great for sports eve..(PAM002) Megaphone - Loudhailer 25W Handheld
The built-in microphone makes this 25W megaphone very easy to use, and the built in siren can easily grab the attention of everyone in the area. 25W of power extends the radius in which your voice can be heard up to 600 meters. Horn diameter: Ø230 Length: 365mm Rated power: 25W Sound coverage: approx. 600m Material: ABS Net weight: 1450g Power requirement: 1.5V(size C) x 6 Speaking: default Siren: default ..
(PAM003B) Megaphone 10W Mini Handheld With Record Function
(PAM003B) Megaphone 10W Mini Handheld With Record Function
(PAM003B) Megaphone 10W Mini Handheld With Record Function This mini megaphone has a 10 second recording function, which plays back in a loop. Great for when the same message has to be repeated over and over   Output Power: 10W Horn Diameter: 155mm Lenght: 245mm Range: Aprox 250 Meters Voice / Siren Switch Sliding volume control Fold away pistol grip handle with nylon carry strap Power Requirement: 4 x ..
(PAM005) Megaphone / Loudhailer 45W with Siren & Detachable Mic
(PAM005) Megaphone / Loudhailer 45W with Siren & Detachable Mic
Megaphone / Loudhailer / Bullhorn 45W with Siren & Detachable Microphone This 45-Watt Megaphone is very powerfull and gives a very wide dispesion of sound. It comes with an attached remote microphone so you can deliver your message loud and clear without straining your arms. Carry the megaphone on your shoulder with the strap or place the megaphone on a table and talk into the microphone instead of holding the complete megaphone to you..
(PAM006) Handheld Megaphone 35W Talk,siren, and MP3 Player
(PAM006) Handheld Megaphone 35W Talk,siren, and MP3 Player
USB and SD inputs for playback of MP3s via megaphone 700 to 1000 meter range Handheld microphone with spiral cable and anti-feedback switch Comfortable handling thanks to low weight and ergonomic handle Low energy consumption Weatherproof design Power: 35W Connections: 1 x USB, 1 x SD Playable formats: MP3 Microphone holder Built-in siren Lightweight, sturdy ABS housing Adjustable volume Hand..A range of  megaphones and loudhailers for public address, electioneering use. Megaphones for sale in South Africa.
keywords" content="megaphones, loudhailers, bullhorns, megaphone, handheld megaphone, loudhailer, loud hailer, bull horn, megaphone south africa, megaphone durban, elections megaphones, electioneering megaphones
"Public announcement" redirects here. For the musical group, see Public Announcement (group).
 
Horn loudspeakers are often used to broadcast sound in outdoor locations
 
US Navy Rear Admiral Michelle J. Howard uses the 1MC shipboard public address system to address the crew of USS Wasp (LHD 1)
 
General quarters
MENU0:00
A call to general quarters aboard a United States Navy vessel.
Problems playing this file? See media help.
A public address system (PA system) is an electronic sound amplification and distribution system with a microphone, amplifier and loudspeakers, used to allow a person to address a large public, for example for announcements of movements at large and noisy air and rail terminals or at a sports stadium. The term is also used for systems which may additionally have a mixing console, and amplifiers and loudspeakers suitable for music as well as speech, used to reinforce a sound source, such as recorded music or a person giving a speech or distributing the sound throughout a venue or building.
 
Simple PA systems are often used in small venues such as school auditoriums, churches, and small bars. PA systems with many speakers are widely used to make announcements in public, institutional and commercial buildings and locations. Intercom systems, installed in many buildings, have microphones in many rooms allowing the occupants to respond to announcements.
 
Sound reinforcement systems and PA systems may use some similar components, but with differing application, although the distinction between the two is not clear-cut. Sound reinforcement systems are for live music or performance, whereas PA systems are primarily for reproduction of speech.[1] In Britain any PA system he simplest PA systems consist of a microphone, an amplifier, and one or more loudspeakers. Simple and small PA systems of this type, often providing 50 to 200 watts of power, are often used in small venues such as school auditoriums, churches, and small bars. A sound source such as a Compact Disc player or radio may be connected to a PA system so that music can be played through the system.
 
Public address systems consist of input sources, amplifiers, control and monitoring equipment, and loudspeakers. The primary input sources are microphones for live announcements and a source of recorded sound. There may be a system which allows operators, or automated equipment, to select from a number of standard prerecorded messages. These input sources are fed into preamplifiers and signal routers that determine the zones to which the audio signal is fed. The preamplified signals are then passed into the amplifiers. Depending on local practices these amplifiers will usually amplify the audio signals to 50V, 70V or 100V speaker line level.[14] Control equipment monitors the amplifiers and speaker lines for faults before it reaches the loudspeakers. This control equipment is also used for separating zones in a PA system. The loudspeaker is used to convert electrical signals into sound.Large systems[edit]
 
Public Address System consisting of amplifiers, mixers, and routers for a major international airport
Some PA systems have speakers that cover an entire campus of a college or industrial site, or an entire outdoor complex (e.g., an athletic stadium). A large PA system may also be used as an alert system during an emergency.
 
Telephone paging systems[edit]
Some analog or IP private branch exchange (PBX) telephone systems use a paging facility that acts as a liaison between the telephone and a PA amplifier. In other systems, paging equipment is not built into the telephone system. Instead the system includes a separate paging controller connected to a trunk port of the telephone system. The paging controller is accessed as either a designated directory number or central office line. In many modern systems, the paging function is integrated into the telephone system, and allows announcements to be played over the phone speakers.
 
Many retailers and offices choose to use the telephone system as the sole access point for the paging system, because the features are integrated. Many schools and other larger institutions are no longer using the large, bulky microphone PA systems and have switched to telephone system paging, as it can be accessed from many different points in the school.PA over IP[edit]
PA over IP refers to PA paging and intercom systems that use an IP network instead of a centralized amplifier to distribute the audio signal to paging locations across a building or campus, or anywhere else in the reach of the IP network (including the Internet). Network-attached amplifiers and intercom units are used to provide the communication function. At the transmission end, a computer application transmits a digital audio stream via the local area network, using audio from the computer's sound card inputs or from stored audio recordings. At the receiving end, either specialized intercom modules (sometimes known as IP speakers) receive these network transmissions and reproduce the analog audio signal. These are small specialized network appliances addressable by an IP address just like any other computer on the network.[15]
 
Such systems are inter-connected by the networking infrastructure and thus allow loss-less transmission to remote locations across the Internet or a local area or campus network. It is also possible to provide for multiple or relocatable transmission control stations on such a network.
 
Long line PA[edit]
 
London Underground employee making a Long Line Public Address system announcement using an RPA01 Radio Microphone at Bank Station
A Long-Line Public Address (LLPA) system is any public address system with a distributed architecture, normally across a wide geographic area. Systems of this type are commonly found in the rail, light rail and metro industries and allow announcements to be triggered from one or several locations to the rest of the network over low bandwidth legacy copper, normally PSTN lines using DSL modems, or media such as optical fiber, or GSM-R, or IP-based networks.[16]
 
Rail systems typically have an interface with a passenger information system (PIS) server, at each station linked to train describers which state the location of rolling stock on the network from sensors on trackside signaling equipment. The PIS system invokes a stored message to be played from a local or remote digital voice announcement system, or a series of message fragments to be assembled in the correct order, for example: " / the / 23.30 / First_Great_Western /Night_Riviera_sleeper_service / from / London_Paddington / to / Penzance / .... / will depart from platform / one / this train is formed of / 12_carriages /." Messages are routed via an IP network and are played on local amplification equipment. Taken together, the PA, routing, DVA, passenger displays and PIS interface are referred to as the customer information system (CIS), a term which itself is often used interchangeably with the term passenger information system.[citation needed]
 
Small venue systems[edit]
Small clubs and bars use a fairly simple set-up, with large Front of House speakers and subwoofers aimed at the audience, and smaller monitor speakers aimed back at the performers so that they can hear their vocals and instruments. In many cases, the Front of House speakers are elevated, either by mounting them on poles or by "flying" them from anchors in the ceiling. The subwoofers do not need to be elevated. In the smallest coffeehouses and bars, the audio mixer may be onstage so that the performers can mix their own sound levels.[17] In larger bars, the audio mixer may be located in or behind the audience seating area, so that an audio engineer can listen to the mix and adjust the sound levels. The adjustments to the monitor speaker mix may be made by a single audio engineer using the main mixing board, or they may be made by a second audio engineer who uses a separate mixing board.
 
 
This small venue's stage shows a typical PA system.
Large venue systems[edit]
For popular music concerts, a more powerful and more complicated PA System is used to provide live sound reproduction. In a concert setting, there are typically two complete PA systems: the "main" system and the "monitor" system. Each system consists of a mixing board, sound processing equipment, amplifiers, and speakers. The microphones that are used to pick up vocals and amplifier sounds are routed through both the main and monitor systems. Audio engineers can set different sound levels for each microphone on the main and monitor systems. For example, a backup vocalist whose voice has a low sound level in the main mix may ask for a much louder sound level through her monitor speaker, so she can hear her singing.
 
The "main" system (also known as "Front of House", commonly abbreviated FOH), which provides the amplified sound for the audience, will typically use a number of powerful amplifiers driving a range of large, heavy-duty loudspeakers including low-frequency speaker cabinets called subwoofers, full-range speaker cabinets, and high-range horns. A large club may use amplifiers to provide 3000 to 5000 watts of power to the "main" speakers; an outdoor concert may use 10,000 or more watts.
The "monitor" system reproduces the sounds of the performance and directs them towards the onstage performers (typically using wedge-shaped monitor speaker cabinets), to help them to hear the instruments and vocals. In British English, the monitor system is referred to as the "foldback". The monitor system in a large club may provide 500 to 1000 watts of power to several foldback speakers; at an outdoor concert, there may be several thousand watts of power going to the monitor system.
At a concert in which live sound reproduction is being used, sound engineers and technicians control the mixing boards for the "main" and "monitor" systems, adjusting the tone, levels, and overall volume of the performance.
 
 
A line array speaker system and subwoofer cabinets at a live music concert
Touring productions will travel with relocatable large line-array PA systems, sometimes rented from an audio equipment hire company. The sound equipment moves from venue to venue along with various other equipment such as lighting and projection.
 
Acoustic feedback[edit]
All PA systems have a potential for audio feedback, which occurs when sound from the speakers is picked up by the microphone and is then re-amplified and sent through the speakers again. It often sounds like a loud high-pitched squeal or screech, and can occur when the volume of the system is turned up too high. Feedback only occurs when the loop gain of the feedback loop is greater than one, so it can always be stopped by reducing the volume sufficiently. Sound engineers take several steps to maximize gain before feedback, including keeping microphones at a distance from speakers, ensuring that directional microphones are not pointed towards speakers, keeping the onstage volume levels down, and lowering gain levels at frequencies where the feedback is occurring, using a graphic equalizer, a parametric equalizer, or a notch filter.he history of Public Address (P.A.) systems has started in ancient Greece where amphitheatres were designed so well that even the turning of pages by an orator could be heard in every seat. Panasonic P.A. systems combine the very latest technology in amplifiers, microphones and speakers to bring this ideal audio environment to modern public spaces. With these equipment so carefully designed, it looks as good as it sounds.
 
This unbeatable combination of auditory and visible quality has made Panasonic P.A. systems the choice of acoustic professionals for more than forty years. Innovations spanning the full spectrum of Panasonic electronic expertise now make them better than ever, whatever your application is.A public address system (PA system) is an electronic amplification system with a mixer, amplifier and loudspeakers, used to reinforce a sound source, e.g., a person giving a speech, a DJ playing prerecorded music, and distributing the sound throughout a venue or building.
 
Simple PA systems are often used in small venues such as school auditoriums, churches, and small bars. PA systems with a larger number of speakers are widely used in institutional and commercial buildings, to read announcements or declare states of emergency. Intercom systems, which are often used in schools, also have microphones in each room so that the occupants can reply to the central office.Suppliers of public address systems and PA and sound system components and accessories in Johannesburg, Gauteng.pa, public address,pa system,microphone,speaker,ceiling speaker,amplifier,tone generator,emergency pa, alarm,wall speakers,booster,horn speaker,venue, sound system,DJ,music,speaking,airport PUBLIC ADDRESS
DOVECOR SPECIALIZES IN THE DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND SALES OF PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS OF ALL SIZES AND FOR ALL APPLICATIONS
 
 
 
We have supplied and installed systems all over South Africa, from factories to hospitals, schools, refineries, clinics and offices.
 
PA systems range from a basic Amplifier, single horn or cabinet speaker to arrays of horn speakers on each column in one of the largest warehouses in Jhb. So we should be able to help you with your requirements.What is a public address system?
A public address system (PA system) is an electronic sound amplification and distribution system with a microphone, amplifier and loudspeakers, used to allow a person to address a large audience. For example: announcements of movements at large and noisy air and rail terminals.
 
The term is also used for systems which may additionally have a mixing console, and amplifiers and loudspeakers suitable for music as well as speech, used to reinforce a sound source, such as recorded music or a person giving a speech or distributing the sound throughout a venue or building.
 
Simple PA systems are often used in small venues such as schools & churches, PA systems with speakers are widely used to make announcements in public, institutional and commercial buildings and locations. Intercom systems, installed in buildings, have microphones in rooms allowing the occupants to respond to announcements.
 
The simplest PA systems consist of a microphone, an amplifier, and one or more loudspeakers. Simple and small PA systems of this type, often providing 50 to 200 watts of power. A sound source such as a Compact Disc player or radio may be connected to a PA system so that music can be played through the system.
 
Sound reinforcement systems and PA systems may use some similar components, but with differing application, although the distinction between the two is not precise. Sound reinforcement systems are for live music or performance, whereas PA systems are primarily for reproduction of speech. Radio World cc - Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, Public Address Systems, Electronic Components, Energy Solutions
Radio World cc - Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, Public Address Systems, Electronic Components, Energy Solutions
School One-Way intercom system
Example of a 40 classroom one-way intercom system Our range of portable PA systems is comprehensive. please scroll down for a selection of our range – if there is something you are looking for that you don’t see please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information.
 
 
MIPRO range 
 
MIPRO are specialists at wireless portable sound systems. The MIPRO range provide solutions for all crowd sizes and is internationally renowned for its innovation, sound quality, and proven reliability, with a distribution network to over 75 countries.
 
MIPRO portable products are lightweight, features-packed, easy to use and provide outstanding value in today’s competitive electronics market place. If you have any queries please don’t hesitate to contact us.PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
 
Just like electronic sirens, electronic public address systems are also devices designed for exterior and interior sound distribution. Unlike electronic sirens these systems have the output of the electronic amplifiers divided between several loudspeakers with lower output. The loudspeakers are therefore mounted closer to each other and are commonly connected to the amplifier via 100V distribution systems. The application of smaller outputs and a higher number of loudspeakers make it possible to improve notification clarity and coverage. On the other hand the costs of system establishment and maintenance increase substantially if the system is to cover larger areas. Mainly the lines are susceptible to failures, if they are not placed underground in a proper manner. Underground lines, however, would increase system establishment costs to an even greater extent.
 
Wireless public address systems
The issues of unreliability and damage susceptibility, in particular in connection with aerial lines, are eliminated via the application of modern wireless public address systems. Wireless public address systems use radio communication for broadcasting both control signals and notifications. They basically consist of a radio broadcasting unit and radio speakers. The acoustic speakers are arranged within the designated area in the same manner as the loudspeakers of line broadcasters.
 
However, apart from loudspeakers, the acoustic speakers also contain an electronic amplifier and a radio receiver/transmitter. Simpler systems use a radio receiver only. Such acoustic speakers, however, are neither capable of sending status feedback, nor capable of examining the radio channel and thus cannot be used as a warning device, even in the simplest applications. Wireless public address systems do not require direct line connection to the central unit since they receive notifications and control commands via radio. They do, however, require a connection to the electric power network. Wireless public address systems are usually mounted on public lighting poles and at night, when lighting is on, their built-in batteries are being recharged to be used as a power supply system during the day. In some countries free radio channels are assigned to such systems making the establishment of these systems easier. These channels can be used if such wireless public address system is used only for informational purposes. Their use as a warning system, however, does not meet safety standards.
 
Public Address Systems, Electronic Public Address Systems, Modern Public Address System, Wireless Modern Public Address System
 
Requirements placed on modern public address systems
Current modern public address systems, including our company’s product AMADEO, are capable of combining the requirements placed on electronic sirens and the requirements placed on fire warning systems or industrial warning systems. They also integrate the functions of control and monitoring systems and are even capable of meeting some functions connected with building and operation automation such as gate control, traffic barrier control, ventilation systems etc. thereby representing complex solutions available at optimal prices and meeting the most demanding requirements.power supplies, megaphones, pa systems, disco, audio cables, hdmi , speakers stands, microphones, headphones

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